Dong Lee, MD Article 1

The prevalence of celiac disease among patients with nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome is similar to controls.

Source

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20889-5000, USA. brooks.cash@med.navy.mil

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Guidelines recommend that patients with symptoms of nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome (NC-IBS) undergo testing for celiac disease (CD). We evaluated the prevalence of CD antibodies, and biopsy confirmed CD among patients with NC-IBS in a large US population.

METHODS:

In a study conducted at 4 sites, from 2003 to 2008, we compared data from 492 patients with symptoms of NC-IBS to 458 asymptomatic individuals who underwent colonoscopy examinations for cancer screening or polyp surveillance (controls). All participants provided blood samples for specific and nonspecific CD-associated antibodies. Additionally, patients with IBS were analyzed for complete blood cell counts, metabolic factors, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and levels of C-reactive protein and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Any subjects found to have CD-associated antibodies were offered esophagogastroduodenoscopy and duodenal biopsy analysis.

RESULTS:

Of patients with NC-IBS, 7.3% had abnormal results for CD-associated antibodies, compared with 4.8% of controls (adjusted odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval: 0.76-2.90; P=.25). Within the NC-IBS group, 6.51% had antibodies against gliadin, 1.22% against tissue transglutaminase, and 0.61% against endomysium (P>.05 vs controls for all antibodies tested). CD was confirmed in 0.41% of patients in the NC-IBS group and 0.44% of controls (P>.99).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although CD-associated antibodies are relatively common, the prevalence of CD among patients with NC-IBS is similar to that among controls in a large US population. These findings challenge recommendations to routinely screen patients with NC-IBS for CD. More than 7% of patients with NC-IBS had CD-associated antibodies, suggesting that gluten sensitivity might mediate IBS symptoms; further studies are needed.

Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
21762658
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
 
PMCID:
PMC3186819